K3H277 The nutritional needs of children and what constitutes nutritionally balanced meals and snacks

K3H277 The nutritional needs of children and what constitutes nutritionally balanced meals and snacks

It is widely recognised that a healthy, balanced diet is essential for preventing disease and illness, managing your weight, living longer and keeping things such as hair, skin and nails in good condition.  There has been a large amount of research in recent years into problems of childhood obesity and it has been proven that diet and physical activity in a child’s early years can affect their health in later life.  There are eight Government guidelines for a healthy diet:-

  1. •Enjoy your food.
  2. •Eat a variety of different foods.
  3. •Eat the right amount to maintain a healthy weight.
  4. •Eat  plenty of foods rich in starch and fibre.
  5. •Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables.
  6. •Do not eat too many foods that contain a lot of fat.
  7. •Do not have sugary foods and drinks too often.
  8. •If you drink alcohol, drink sensibly. (Obivously this guideline does not apply to children).

Balance of Good Health

Based on the United Kingdom’s government guidelines the balance of good health is divided into five food groups.

The 5 food groups are:

  • Bread, cereals and potatoes
  • Fruit and vegetables
  • Meat, fish and alternatives
  • Milk and dairy
  • Foods containing fat, foods containing sugar

The above types of foods and the proportions make up a healthy balanced diet.  In a balanced diet you should aim to eat around 5-10 portions of starchy foods, alongside eating 2-3 portions of meat, fish or alternatives and 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a day.  Try to keep to 2 portions of fatty or sugary foods a day in your diet.

The five main food groups:

Group Main nutrients provided Role of nutrient
1)    Bread, other cereals and potatoes Carbohydrate (Starch) Provides energy, Starchy carbohydrates are broken down and converted to glucose.  The glucose is stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles or is circulated in the bloodstream and used as energy.
Calcium Develops and maintains teeth and bones.
Iron Haemoglobin formation in the blood and also a component of many enzymes.
B Vitamins Haemoglobin formation in the blood and also a component of many enzymes.
Dietary fibre Not absorbed by the body but passes through the gastrointestinal tract, helping it to keep healthy.
Protein Growth and repair of the body any excess is used to provide energy.
2)    Fruit and vegetables Vitamin C Maintains and helps in the structure of connective tissue and bones.  Required for wound healing and the absorption of iron from non-meat sources. May help prevent the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer.
Carotenes Contributes in the formation of Vitamin A in the body.  Required for the maintenance and repair of tissues necessary for growth and development.  Essential for the immune system to function and helps night vision.
Folates Required for the formation of blood cells.
Carbohydrate (Starch) Provides energy, Starchy carbohydrates are broken down and converted to glucose.  The glucose is stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles or is circulated in the bloodstream and used as energy.
Dietary fibre Not absorbed by the body but passes through the gastrointestinal tract, helping it to keep healthy.
3)    Milk and dairy foods Calcium Develops and maintains teeth and bones.
Protein Haemoglobin formation in the blood and also a component of many enzymes.
Vitamin B12 Required for the formation of blood cells and nerve fibres.
Vitamin A Required for the maintenance and repair of tissues necessary for the growth and development.  Essential for the immune system to function and helps night vision.
Vitamin D Essential for healthy teeth and bones helps with calcium and phosphate absorption from food.
4)    Meat, fish and alternatives (Pulses etc) Iron Haemoglobin formation in the blood and also a component of many enzymes.
Protein Haemoglobin formation in the blood and also a component of many enzymes.
B vitamins (B12) Haemoglobin formation in the blood and also a component of many enzymes.
Zinc Required for growth of tissues, immune function and wound healing.
Magnesium Required for bone development, nerve and muscle function.  Also helps in the function of some enzymes involved in energy use.
5)    Foods containing fat and or sugar Fat Provides energy (only moderate amounts of fat are required).
Carbohydrate (Sugar) Provides energy, carbohydrates are broken down and converted to glucose.  The glucose is stored as glycogen in the liver and muscles or is circulated in the bloodstream and used as energy.

A balanced diet should be made up of the 5 main food groups in the correct proportions as no single food contains all the essential nutrients that the body needs to maintain a healthy function.  Nutritional requirements will vary depending on a person’s age, sex and overall fitness level so the correct diet will provide a balance of carbohydrates, fat and protein.  Too little protein can interfere with body function and growth and too much fat can lead to obesity and heart disease.

Other people searched for:

k3h277, The nutritional needs of children and what constitutes nutritionally balanced meals and snacks, identify balanced meals snacks and drinks for children in their early years following current government guidance on nutritional needs, nutritional needs of children, ccld k3h277, identify balanced meals snacks and drinks for children in their early years, nutritionally balanced meals for children, balanced meals snacks and drinks for children, k3h277 and k3h280, identify balanced meals snacks